Tenant Credit Report Unable to Score?

Did you order a Tenant Credit Report from us and receive the message:

Score:   Unable to Score

There can be a few reasons why the tenant’s credit could not be scored.  Here are a few possibilities and what you can do about them:

  • Confirm that the applicant’s name matches their Social Security Number. You can do this by looking in the Details section of the credit report for the word no-hit.

What you can do: If your applicant’s name does not match their Social Security Number a credit report cannot be returned.  Confirm with the applicant their legal name and Social Security number.

  • The applicant is young or a recent US Citizen and does not yet possess enough active credit such as a student loan, auto loan, mortgage or credit cards.

What you can do: If your tenant applicant is young check with your state landlord laws to see if you can ask for an extra initial deposit up front or ask the applicant if they can provide a W-2 or recent pay stubs to confirm their income or have a parent co-sign the application and lease. Most credit bureaus cannot generate a positive score unless the applicant possesses at least 2 active lines of credit.

  • The applicant has lived their life paying cash for everything and have not taken out any loans or had to pay any creditors.

What you can do: If your tenant applicant does not have any debt check with your state landlord laws to see if you can ask for an extra initial deposit up front to help protect yourself or ask the applicant if they can provide a W-2 or recent pay stubs to confirm their income or have someone co-sign the application and lease.  Most credit bureaus cannot generate a positive score unless the applicant possesses at least 2 active lines of credit.

  • The applicant has previously had loans and debt, but has either closed all of his/her accounts and does not possess enough open accounts for a score to be generated.

What you can do: If your tenant applicant has previously had credit but all accounts are now closed, check with your state landlord laws to see if you can ask for an extra initial deposit up front or ask the applicant if they can provide a W-2 or recent pay stubs to confirm their income or have someone co-sign the application and lease.  Also ask your credit reporting agency if there are any additional details on why & when the accounts were closed.  Extra information can sometimes be provided such as if they were closed normally or paid as agreed.

  • The applicant has previously had loans and debt, but filed for bankruptcy and all of his/her accounts were closed as part of the bankruptcy filing.

What you can do: If your tenant applicant has previously had credit but all accounts are now closed, check with your state landlord laws to see if you can ask for an extra initial deposit up front or ask the applicant if they can provide a W-2 or recent pay stubs to confirm their income or have someone co-sign the application and lease.  Also, ask your credit reporting agency if there are any additional details on when the bankruptcy occurred and if there has been any additional debt or collections since then.  Extra information can sometimes be provided such as the closed date, if they were closed normally, or paid or paying as agreed.

  • The applicant has previously had loans and debt, but all accounts are now in collections.

What you can do: If your tenant applicant has previously had credit but all accounts are now closed, check with your state landlord laws to see if you can ask for an extra initial deposit up front or ask the applicant if they can provide a W-2 or recent pay stubs to confirm their income or have someone co-sign the application and lease.  Also, ask your credit reporting agency if there are any additional details on if these accounts are in collections, when they went to collections and if they are still in collections with a balance.

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